Tag Archives: my books

AB: Butterick – Vogue Sewing

(This is an entry in the Annotated Bibliography.)

*Butterick Publishing Company, The. Vogue Sewing. Revised edition. New York: The Butterick Publishing Company, 2000.

This is the revised edition; it was previously published under the titles New Vogue Sewing Book and Vogue Sewing Book; first version published 1985. This is a decent general reference book for modern sewing.  I personally own this book, and would recommend it as a general reference, provided a copy can be found inexpensively.

AB: Marsh – Styles and So Forth

(This is an entry in the Annotated Bibliography.)

*Marsh, Heidi, Compiled by. Styles and So Forth of the Era of the Hoop; with Glossary. Greenville, California: Heidi Marsh, 1994.

Alas, this is an incomplete entry in the annotated bibliography. More soon. However, I can say that I personally own this book, and would recommend it.

AB: Marsh – Hair, Hat, Hood, and Bonnet, Too

(This is an entry in the Annotated Bibliography.)

*Marsh, Heidi, Compiled by. Hair, Hat, Hood, and Bonnet Too; of the Era of the Hoop. Greenville, California: Heidi Marsh, 1993.

Alas, this is an incomplete entry in the annotated bibliography. More soon. However, I can say that  I personally own this book, and would recommend it.

AB: Shep – Civil War Ladies

(This is an entry in the Annotated Bibliography.)

Shep, R. L. Civil War Ladies: Fashions and Needle-Arts of the Early 1860’s; Primary Source Material from Peterson’s Magazine 1861 and 1864; Additional Hair Styles and Hair Jewelry from Campbell’s “Self-Instructor in the Art of Hair Work.” Mendocino, California: R. L. Shep, 1987.

Alas, this is an incomplete entry in the annotated bibliography. More soon. However, I can say that I personally own this book, and would recommend it.

AB: Dalrymple – American Victorian Costume

(This is an entry in the Annotated Bibliography.)

*Dalrymple, Priscilla Harris. American Victorian Costume in Early Photographs. New York: Dover, 1991.

Alas, this is an incomplete entry in the annotated bibliography. More soon. In the meantime, I can say that I personally own this book, and would recommend it.

AB: Leisch – Who Wore What

(This is an entry in the Annotated Bibliography.)

*Leisch, Juanita. Who Wore What: Women’s Wear 1861-1865. Gettysburg, Pennsylvania: Thomas Publications, 1995.

Alas, this is an incomplete entry in the annotated bibliography. More soon. However, I can say that I personally own this book, and would highly recommend it.

AB: Clark – Practical Prinkery

(This is an entry in the Annotated Bibliography.)

*Clark, Mrs. (Elizabeth Stewart). Practical Prinkery: The Guide to Recreating Mid-19th Century Clothing for Young Women Twelve to Twenty-one. Idaho Falls, Idaho: Elizabeth Stewart Clark & Company, 2004.

This is a wonderful little book that focuses on the clothing needs of young women in their transitional teenage years, for mid-19th century clothing. It includes excellent construction information, including pattern-drafting and draping techniques, and even explains how to use duct tape to create a custom-fitting corset pattern, and then how to construct a corset from that or another pattern. See entry for The Dressmaker’s Guide for more information about the author’s works and expertise. This book overlaps with both the original and the second edition of the Guide, but it is valuable on its own in the area of young women’s clothing, and is not redundant to the 1st or 2nd edition of the Guide. I personally own this book, and would highly recommend it.

Also by Elizabeth Stewart Clark:

AB: Clark – Skirting the Issue

(This is an entry in the Annotated Bibliography.)

*Clark, Mrs. (Elizabeth Stewart). Skirting the Issue: A Workbook for Skirts & Petticoats: A Construction Guide for Skirts, Including Variations and Embellishments, In the Style of the 1850s and 1860s. Idaho Falls, Idaho: Elizabeth Stewart Clark & Company, 2004.

This is a wonderful little book that focuses on constructing historically accurate mid-19th century skirts and petticoats. It includes excellent construction information, including pattern-drafting techniques based on simple measurements, with many construction and design variations offered. See entry for The Dressmaker’s Guide for more information about the author’s works and expertise. Note that the content of this book has been fully incorporated into the 2nd edition of the Guide, and therefore this book is redundant to that one, whereas this book was originally a companion to the earlier Dressmaker’s Guide to Fit & Fashion. I personally own this book, and would recommend it, but would suggest that a copy of the 2nd edition of the Guide would be a more comprehensive choice.

Also by Elizabeth Stewart Clark:

AB: Clark – Dressmaker’s Guide 2nd Ed

(This is an entry in the Annotated Bibliography.)

*Clark, Elizabeth Stewart. The Dressmaker’s Guide; 1840-1860. 2nd edition, Revised & Expanded. Idaho Falls, Idaho: Elizabeth Stewart Clark & Company, 2009.

This book is a greatly expanded second edition of the author’s 2004 Dressmaker’s Guide to Fit & Fashion. It fully incorporates the material in the earlier companion volume Skirting the Issue, and has further content as well, with an emphasis on the fashion changes over the period. It is wonderfully written and highly readable, with good, practical instructions for a great many projects. Because this book is a general, functional resource primarily intended for reenactors and living historians, it does not generally cite sources or really explain how information was obtained. However, Mrs. Clark’s websites, forum posts, and conference workshops make it clear that she is a well-informed expert whose information is gleaned from extensive, detailed research. More information can be found at her main website and the mid-19th century authentic sewing forum she hosts, The Sewing Academy.

This wonderful book is an excellent primer on historical sewing, and has applications far more broadly even than the period which is covers. There is a strong emphasis throughout on trying to understand historical approaches (and why they might actually work better than modern substitutions) and on doing research carefully. The book, very helpfully, covers fitting issues and even draping patterns on a person, for corsets and bodices. I personally own this book, and would highly recommend this resource, especially when used in combination with Mrs. Clark’s readily accessible forum.

Also by Elizabeth Stewart Clark:

AB: Clark – Dressmaker’s Guide to Fit and Fashion

(This is an entry in the Annotated Bibliography.)

*Clark, Mrs. (Elizabeth Stewart). The Dressmaker’s Guide To Fit & Fashion; Including techniques for drafting, fitting, and constructing the clothing of the early 1860’s. Learn to make lovely and correct clothing with the help of illustrations, diagrams, and descriptive instructions with the home-dressmaker in mind. Idaho Falls, Idaho: Elizabeth Stewart Clark & Company, 2004.

This wonderful little book is essentially focused on the years of the American Civil War, but it is relevant for a wider time span than its title would seem to indicate. In fact, Mrs. Clark’s websites are focused on the period of 1840-1865, as is the latest, expanded edition of her Dressmaker’s Guide, which combines her both this book and the companion Skirting the Issue into one volume, along with a substantial quantity of additional information. Because this book is a general, functional resource primarily intended for reenactors and living historians, it does not cite sources or really explain how information was obtained. However, Mrs. Clark’s websites, forum posts, and conference workshops make it clear that she is a well-informed expert whose information is gleaned from extensive, detailed research. More information can be found at her main website and the mid-19th century authentic sewing forum she hosts, The Sewing Academy.

This book covers the construction of undergarments and dresses, as well as some outerwear and accessories, explaining construction methods, pattern-drafting and draping techniques, and tips for achieving a historically accurate and flattering fit. It also contains instructions for creating a custom-shaped dress form using duct tape. It is a very helpful book, but the revised edition version, which is greatly expanded, is even more so. This book is instructional. It contains monochrome images. It contains a “Read More About It” further reading list that briefly covers some research concepts and techniques. I personally own this book, and would highly recommend it, but I would even more strongly recommend acquiring a copy of newer expanded edition.

Also by Elizabeth Stewart Clark: