Tag Archives: silk fiber

Glossary: Velvet and Other Pile Fabrics

Velvet is a type of pile fabric, which can be made of various fibers. Traditionally, velvet is made of silk, or sometimes wool. Historically, the term “plush” seems to have applied to a variety of fibers and fiber combinations, but consistently seems to have had a deeper pile than velvet. Today, velvet is most commonly available made from synthetic fibers, or sometimes from rayon. Burn-out velvets are made of a combination of silk and rayon, and undergo a chemical process to remove some of the material to create a pattern. Cotton velvet is usually made with a short pile, and known as velveteen. Pile fabrics come in many varieties, but for historical, pre-twentieth century applications, generally only natural fiber pile fabrics, and occasionally rayon, are appropriate. Because silk and even cotton velvet ribbons are very difficult to find today but were much used historically, it is sometimes necessary to substitute high quality man-made velvet ribbons; in this case, man-made cellulosic fibers such as rayon and acetate, are preferable to noncellulosic synthetics such as polyester and acrylic.

Definitions of velvet, plush, velveteen, and other pile fabrics from a variety of print resources, each of which contains further information:

On page 46, under the heading “Velvet,” it is stated that “Velvet is a dense, pile-woven fabric commonly produced in cotton or silk. Florence Montgomery notes that it was also produced in wool in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries (Textiles in America, 370). Depending upon one’s budget, either cotton or silk velvet could be used in the early nineteenth century for breeches or pantaloons, vests, cloaks or greatcoats, and dresses. Velvet was also much used as trimming and embellishment; for example, many men’s coats and cloaks from the period have velvet collars. The sample shown here is cotton velvet.”

All on page 180: “Velvet” is defined as “silk fabric cut with a dense pile on right side, may have a cotton back.” Then “cut velvet” is defined as “velvet with the pile loops cut so the pile is of single threads.” Later, “uncut velvet” is defined as “pile velvet; loops of the pile are not cut.” Then “velveteen” is defined as “cotton fabric made in imitation of velvet.” Then “wool velour” is defined as “heavy wool fabric with a pile like velvet.”

On page 179, “plush” is defined as “fine quality cotton fabric with a pile or nap of silk, softer and longer than velvet.”

On page 370, “velvet” is defined as “A pile fabric made of silk, wool, or cotton fibers. It is an extra-warp woven-pile structure whereas velveteen is an extra-weft structure.” Also on page 370, “velveteen” is defined as “Cotton velvet. According to Emery it has an extra-weft woven-pile structure.” On page 325, “plush (Fr. peluche)” is defined as “Wool velvet. A kind of stuff with a velvet nap or shag on one side.”

On page 287, “Manchester velvets” are defined as “Cotton velvets including thickset, velveret, and corduroy.” On page 363, “thickset” is defined as “A kind of cotton fustian or velvet made either plain or flowered.” On page 370, “velveret” is defined as “A cotton pile fabric, often ribbed like corduroy, and largely made in the Machester area from about 1750” and the entry goes on to discuss how they were often stamped and patterned.

On page 205, “corduroy” is defined as “‘A kind of coarse, durable cotton fabric, having a piled surface, like that of velvet, raised in cords, ridges, or ribs’ (Merriam-Webster). It was made with an extra weft in the pile. The character of corduroy has not changed greatly since the late eighteenth century.”

Online Resources:

For more information about an individual fiber, fabric, or other material, select it on the right side menu for “Fibers, Fabrics, and Materials.” This will bring up all entries which have that tag, including (in most cases) a Glossary post like this one, which will offer a definition of that fiber, fabric, or material, and sometimes also offer useful links to outside sources on working with it. For more general information, visit the core entry for the Glossary: Fibers, Fabrics, and Materials. For a directory of all textile glossary posts, go to the Glossary Table of Contents.

Updated January 10, 2012


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Glossary: Silk Satin

Silk satin is a fabric made from silk, a natural fiber produced by silkworms. For more information, see the entry Glossary: Silk Fiber. Silk is the fiber traditionally associated with the term “satin,” though strictly speaking “satin” is a weave rather than a specific fabric. Satins have also historically been available in wool and sometimes cotton, though cotton is more commonly available in sateen than satin. Satin is type of weave with long floating yarns which produce a shiny surface; sateen is a variant of that weave. Note that light, drapey fabrics such as silk charmeuse are different from traditional, true satins, despite being of a type of satin weave. “Duchess satin” or “silk duchesse” are modern textiles which generally seem to be closest to historical satins, however some duchess satin has a synthetic or rayon component, which gives it different properties from 100% silk satin. Synthetic satins and rayon satins are very different from silk satin.

Definitions of satin, especially silk satin, from a variety of print resources, each of which contains further information:

On the topic of “Weaves” on page 16, it states that “Satin is both a weave structure and the name of a fabric. Satin weaves are much like twill weaves. However, the warp yarns float over from four to as many as twelve weft yarns, and the offset of each successive pick is different, so that no diagonal ridge is formed. Sateen is like satin, except that the weft yarn forms the float, rather than the warp. Sateen is generally woven with cotton. Satin weaves are less durable than other weaves, because the long floats of yarn are easily abraded, and they also tend to pick up and hold dirt. For this reason, and because of the elegant luster that the satin weave creates, these fabrics tend to be used for more formal purposes–evening clothes, or high quality table linen.”

On page 45, under the heading “satin,” along with a swatch of figured satin, the text states that “satin is both a weave structure and the name of a fabric. The satin weave can be used with any fiber. Figured, or ‘flowered,’ satin (also called ‘damask’) is woven with complex designs, in small to large scale, generally in a single color. The play of light across the monochrome woven pattern brings out the design, which is reversible. Reversibility had advantages: it was considered economical to invest in a figured satin, because a garment made from such a fabric could be taken apart, turned, and reconstructed to make the garment last an extra long time. Both plain satins and figured satins have been woven for centuries, but in the early 1800s, the invention of the jacquard mechanism made these fabrics much easier to produce.”

  • Butterick Publishing Company, The. Vogue Sewing. Revised edition. New York: The Butterick Publishing Company, 2000.

Page 41: “Satin weave has a characteristic luxurious shine. The surface is composed of floats, or warp yarns, which may pass over many filling yarns before being caught under one. The surface yarns, usually of filament fibers, intersect cross threads at points randomly spaced so the smooth texture appears unbroken. A variation called sateen has similar surface floats, but they run in the filling direction and are usually of a spun staple yarn.”

On page 179, “satin” is defined as “thick, close textured silk fabric with the warp threads completely covering the weft threads,thus producing a glossy surface.” Further types of satin, including thinner varieties, are also defined on the same page, including “satinet,” which is “thin or imitation satin.”

On pages 339-340, “satin” is defined in several quotes from historical sources, similar to previous definitions listed on this page. It is also clarified, on page 340, that “The warp threads are ordinarily much finer than the weft threads and more numerous to the square inch so that they conceal the weft and make an unbroken, smooth, and lustrous surface.”

Online Resources:

For more information about an individual fiber, fabric, or other material, select it on the right side menu for “Fibers, Fabrics, and Materials.” This will bring up all entries which have that tag, including (in most cases) a Glossary post like this one, which will offer a definition of that fiber, fabric, or material, and sometimes also offer useful links to outside sources on working with it. For more general information, visit the core entry for the Glossary: Fibers, Fabrics, and Materials. For a directory of all textile glossary posts, go to the Glossary Table of Contents.

Updated January 10, 2012

Glossary: Silk Twill

Silk twill is a fabric made from silk, a natural fiber produced by silkworms. For more information, see the entry Glossary: Silk Fiber. “Silk twill” is a term commonly used in modern fabric terminology, generally referring to a light- or light-mid-weight material in an even twill weave. The hand of these materials varies, and can range from quite soft and drapey to very crisp. Historically, twilled fabrics woven from silk were referred to by a wide variety of names, including foulard, sarcenet, serge, and armure silk.

Definitions of twilled silk fabrics, and of the twill weave, from a variety of print resources, each of which contains further information:

There are no twilled silks in the book.

Under the heading “Weaves” on page 16, it is stated that “There are many variations of twills, but the distinctive feature of the weave is that it creates parallel diagonal ridges through the cloth. This effect is created by passing the weft yarn, for example, over two warps, under one, over two, under one and so on. The next weft yarn is offset by one warp yarn and then continues as before: over two, under one, over two, under one. The ‘float’ (the yarn that passes over the multiples of the yarn in the opposite direction) can be the weft or the warp, and passes over two or three yarns. The float can reverse directions to create a zigzag pattern, called a ‘herringbone’ twill, or it can form diamonds, for example ‘goose-eye’ or ‘bird’s-eye’ twills. Depending on the fiber, yarn size, and compactness of the beat, twills can be soft and drapey or very tough and stiff.”

  • Butterick Publishing Company, The. Vogue Sewing. Revised edition. New York: The Butterick Publishing Company, 2000.

On page 41, it states that the “Twill weave is often used to produce strong, durable fabrics such as denim and gabardine. A handsome weave characterized by a diagonal ridge usually running from lower left to upper right, its appearance depends to a large extent on the yarn weight and specific twill construction.”

On page 177, “foulard” is defined as “soft, lightweight fabric of silk, or silk and cotton, having a twilled weave, sometimes with a satin finish, often used for handkerchiefs.” On page 179, “sarcenet, sarcenett” and “sarsnet, sarsenet, sarsinet” as well as “sasnet” are all defined as “fine, thin silk fabric, plain or twilled.” Also on page 179, “serge” is defined as “twilled fabric of wool or silk, or both, or of cotton” and “silk serge” is defined as “twilled silk fabric often used for lining.” On page 180, “armure silk” is defined as “a twilled fabric of silk.” Also on page 180, “surah silk” is defined as “soft, strong, twilled India silk fabric.”

On page 242, under the heading “foulard (Fr. foulas),” it is stated that “Three silk handkerchiefs in the Holker manuscript, circa 1750, identify this material as printed…or checked twill, Holker says that such materials were bought in Paris as Indian merchandise, although of English manufacture, for women’s dresses and were called foulas.”

On page 339, “sarsenet (sarsnet; Fr. armoisin)” is defined as “A thin, transparent silk of plain weave.”

On page 369, “twill (tweel)” is defined as “A kind of weave producing a diagonal effect in the finished cloth.” A sample of varieties of twill weaves are listed on page 369: “diamond, herringbone, and bird’s eye.”

Online Resources:

For more information about an individual fiber, fabric, or other material, select it on the right side menu for “Fibers, Fabrics, and Materials.” This will bring up all entries which have that tag, including (in most cases) a Glossary post like this one, which will offer a definition of that fiber, fabric, or material, and sometimes also offer useful links to outside sources on working with it. For more general information, visit the core entry for the Glossary: Fibers, Fabrics, and Materials. For a directory of all textile glossary posts, go to the Glossary Table of Contents.

Updated January 10, 2012

Glossary: Silk Taffeta

Taffeta is a fabric made from silk, a natural fiber produced by silkworms. For more information, see the entry Glossary: Silk Fiber. Taffeta is a light-mid- to mid-weight fabric with a crisp hand, in an even plain weave. Synthetic taffetas are also available today, but they are quite different, and very prone to shredding. Generally, they have a very plastic appearance and do not strongly resemble silk taffeta, though taffeta made from acetate, a man-made cellulosic fiber similar to rayon, is generally more silk-like than substitutes made from noncellulosic synthetic fibers such as polyester and nylon. If seeking an less expensive substitute, some lengths of silk dupioni can be found which are quite smooth and have very few slubs, which can be used as imitation taffeta fairly convincingly in some applications. However, dupioni is not an even-weave fabric; it is plain-woven, but the weft threads are thicker than the warp threads, and are uneven to varying degrees. It is not a perfect substitute, and is not always appropriate.

Definitions of taffeta from a variety of print resources, each of which contains further information:

On page 29, under the heading “Changeable (Shot),” there is a swatch of changeable silk taffeta. The text states that “‘Changeable’ silk–that is, silks woven with one color in the warp and another color in the weft–have been around for centuries and are still easily found today. The play of light on a shimmery changeable silk gives it an iridescent look. The terms ‘changeable’ and ‘shot’ are most commonly used in reference to silk.”

On page 37, under the heading “Lutestring (Lustring),” there is a swatch of crisp, evenly plain-woven silk of a weight closer to habotai than to most taffeta, but with a crisp hand like taffeta. The text states that “Lutestring is a plain-woven silk, similar to taffeta in that it has a crisp hand and even thread count, but lighter in weight than taffeta. Its smooth, glossy surface made it a favorite for elegant dresses for women in the early nineteenth century.”

On page 180, “taffeta, taffetas” is defined as “fine, even-textured, smooth silk fabric with a luster.”

Also on page 180, “tabby, tabi” is defined as “strong, heavy silk taffeta, shiny with a watered finish, also used to describe a plain weave.” On page 177, “gros” is defined as “a heavy silk fabric with a dull finish.” On page 179, “paduasoy” is defined as “plain stout smooth silk, formerly a rich heavy corded silk.” Also on page 179, “pou de soie” is defined (identically to the above) as “plain stout smooth silk, formerly a rich heavy corded silk.”

On page 178, “lustring” is defined as “lustrous paper-thin silk” while, oddly, “lutestring” is defined as “plain, stout silk fabric with a lustrous finish.” On page 180, “silk tissue” is defined as “fine, transparent silk fabric.”

On page 180, “shot silk” is defined as being “woven with warp and weft threads of different colors, so that the fabric changes in tint according to the angle from which it is viewed” and “changeable silk” is “also called shot silk; fabric that is one color from one angel, another color from another angle.” On page 177, “glace,” or glacé, is defined as “usually silk, with a smooth glossy finish, sometimes with a shot effect.” On page 178, “moire,” or moiré, is defined as “a watered effect given fabrics by the pressure of engraved rollers that displace and flatten threads.”

On page 358, there is an entry for “Taffeta (taffety),” which states that “In seventeenth-century trade with Bengal, the term covered a wide variety of silk and silk/cotton goods, many of them striped or checked, among which were alachas, seersuckers, sousaes, and charconnaes.” It also states that “Most European taffetas were plain woven silks with weft threads slightly thicker than warp and related to tabby, alamode, Persian, and lutestring.”

On page 355, “tabby” is defined as “A plain silk, slightly heavier than lustring and stronger and thicker than taffeta. A cloth woven in a plain weave. Many were given a watered or waved finish.” On page 314, “Paduasoy (padaway, pattisway, poudesoy)” is defined as “A rich and heavy silk tabby with a self-colored pattern and usually brocaded. It was generally corded and was the heaviest of dress silks.” On page 321, “Persian” is defined as “A thin plain silk, principally used for linings in coats, petticoats, and gowns in the eighteenth century. Silks from Persia were the most highly esteemed of all Eastern fabrics, and the name Persian may have been given to English imitations to promote their sale.”

On page 195, “changeable fabrics” are defined as “Plain weave fabrics with warp of one color and weft of another. Chambray, caungeantrie, and modern Oxford cloth used for men’s shirts are included among these textiles.” On page 347, “shot” is defined as “A term used to describe textiles made partly of silk.” This may be an earlier usage of the term; I cannot recall having seen the term used this way in nineteenth century sources.

Online Resources:

For more information about an individual fiber, fabric, or other material, select it on the right side menu for “Fibers, Fabrics, and Materials.” This will bring up all entries which have that tag, including (in most cases) a Glossary post like this one, which will offer a definition of that fiber, fabric, or material, and sometimes also offer useful links to outside sources on working with it. For more general information, visit the core entry for the Glossary: Fibers, Fabrics, and Materials. For a directory of all textile glossary posts, go to the Glossary Table of Contents.

Updated January 10, 2012

Glossary: Silk Charmeuse

Charmeuse is a fabric made from silk, a natural fiber produced by silkworms. For more information, see the entry Glossary: Silk Fiber. Charmeuse is also available with a small spandex component to make stretch charmeuse, and there are synthetic versions of charmeuse, usually polyester, available as well. Charmeuse is a type of lightweight satin fabric, thin and with a very soft, drapey hand. It is not what is meant by “silk satin,” in modern or historical use. It is very useful for twentieth century vintage styles, especially lingerie and bias cut 1930s styles. Note that it is quite slithery and difficult to work with, though in my opinion less so than its synthetic equivalents.

Note that some fabrics of this type available today are made of synthetic or man-made fibers, or sometimes silk blended with artificial fibers; blends, and especially fully synthetic/man-made fabrics, do not look, feel, or behave the same way as 100% silk fabrics, though rayon, which is a man-made cellulosic fiber (not a synthetic) is a closer substitute than synthetic fibers. For more information on the differences between natural and man-made fibers, see the entries on synthetic fiber and rayon fiber (which includes information on other cellulosic man-made fibers).

Online Resources:

For more information about an individual fiber, fabric, or other material, select it on the right side menu for “Fibers, Fabrics, and Materials.” This will bring up all entries which have that tag, including (in most cases) a Glossary post like this one, which will offer a definition of that fiber, fabric, or material, and sometimes also offer useful links to outside sources on working with it. For more general information, visit the core entry for the Glossary: Fibers, Fabrics, and Materials. For a directory of all textile glossary posts, go to the Glossary Table of Contents.

Updated January 10, 2012

Glossary: Silk Habotai

Habotai is a fabric made from silk, a natural fiber produced by silkworms. For more information, see the entry Glossary: Silk Fiber. It is also known as China silk. Man-made fiber imitations of habotai, generally made of polyester or rayon, are readily available but quite different, and are unfortunately sometimes sold as “China silk” or “China silk lining.” Habotai is usually opaque, or only very slightly sheer (in lighter colors), made in an even tabby (plain) weave of very fine silk threads. It has a soft, drapey hand. It is comparable to some historical (nineteenth century) definitions of tissue, but not to all. It is similar in weight to period lutestring or lustring, which is lighter in weight than taffeta, but unlike lutestring, habotai has a very soft hand. “Mousseline de soie” was a silk version of muslin, and might possibly be similar to habotai, but I am only guessing.

Definitions of habotai and other soft, lightweight, opaque silks from a variety of print resources, each of which contains further information:

On page 37, under the heading “Lutestring (Lustring),” there is a swatch of crisp, evenly plain-woven silk of a weight closer to habotai than to most taffeta, but with a distinctly different hand. The text states that “Lutestring is a plain-woven silk, similar to taffeta in that it has a crisp hand and even thread count, but lighter in weight than taffeta. Its smooth, glossy surface made it a favorite for elegant dresses for women in the early nineteenth century.”

All on page 178: “lustring” is defined as “lustrous paper-thin silk” while, oddly, “lutestring” is defined as “plain, stout silk fabric with a lustrous finish.” Next, “marcelline” is defined as “thin silk fabric sometimes used for linings.” Later, “mousseline de soie” is defined as “silk muslin, a thin soft silk with a muslin-like weave.” Note that historical muslin differs greatly from modern utility muslin (see entries for cotton voile or cotton batiste for further information). Furthermore, “silk muslin” is defined as “resembled grenadine, except it is all silk while grenadine may be silk and cotton.”

On page 179, “sarcenet, sarcenett” and “sarsnet, sarsenet, sarsinet” as well as “sasnet” are all defined as “fine, thin silk fabric, plain or twilled.” On page 180, “India silk” is defined as “soft, thin, silk fabric with a cambric-like weave.” Back on page 175, “cambric” is defined as “thin, fine white linen fabric.” On page 180, “silk tissue” is defined as “fine, transparent silk fabric.” Also on page 180, “pekin silk” is defined as “silk fabric usually flowered or striped, originally from China.” Also on page 180, “taffeta, taffetas” is defined as “fine, even-textured, smooth silk fabric with a luster.”

Unsurprisingly, there are no definitions for “China silk” or “habotai.”

On page 283, “Lustring (lutestring)” is defined as “A light, crisp plain silk with a high luster.” There is no entry for “mousselaine de soie,” nor for “silk muslin.” On page 321, “Persian” is defined as “A thin plain silk, principally used for linings in coats, petticoats, and gowns in the eighteenth century. Silks from Persia were the most highly esteemed of all Eastern fabrics, and the name Persian may have been given to English imitations to promote their sale.” On page 339, “sarsenet (sarsnet; Fr. armoisin)” is defined as “A thin, transparent silk of plain weave.”

The definition of “tissue” on pages 366-367 are very different from those in Marsh’s glossary (see above), and relate to decorative and ecclesiastical use. On page 366 it is stated that “The weaves often included silver and gold threads. Technically tissue was made with two sets of warp threads and at least two sets of shafts, and with one or more pattern wefts controlled by the figure harness on a drawloom.”

Online Resources:

For more information about an individual fiber, fabric, or other material, select it on the right side menu for “Fibers, Fabrics, and Materials.” This will bring up all entries which have that tag, including (in most cases) a Glossary post like this one, which will offer a definition of that fiber, fabric, or material, and sometimes also offer useful links to outside sources on working with it. For more general information, visit the core entry for the Glossary: Fibers, Fabrics, and Materials. For a directory of all textile glossary posts, go to the Glossary Table of Contents.

Updated January 10, 2012

Glossary: Silk Organza

Organza is a fabric made from silk, a natural fiber produced by silkworms. For more information, see the entry Glossary: Silk Fiber. Organza is commonly available today in synthetic fibers imitating silk, but it can also still be found in silk, in a range of weights and qualities. Essentially, organza is a name for sheer, plain-woven silk (or synthetic imitations) with a very crisp hand. Organza is not a term I have encountered in historical (pre-twentieth century) sources, though I have not researched it specifically.

“Gauze,” “tissue,” and “organdy” are all terms which may or may not be able to be accurately applied to organza-like fabrics in historical use; my research has thus far found conflicting reports about each of these terms. Further investigation is needed.

Silk organza has many applications for twentieth century vintage and modern use, both as a fashion fabric and for use in couture and tailoring construction for facings, linings, and interlinings. It is also popular for curtains, though synthetic and sometimes rayon or acetate versions are generally more common.

Definitions of organza and other crisp, sheer silks from a variety of print resources, each of which contains further information:

Under the heading “silk” on page 13, there is a fabric sample which could be described as organza; it is sheer and very crisp, in this case with slightly thicker, darker threads woven through occasionally to create a textured stripe. On page 14, it is stated that “The sample shown here is appropriate for a fancy dress fabric, especially for the first two decades of the nineteenth century.” A specific period term for that type of silk is not offered.

On page 40, under the heading “mourning,” there is a swatch of what I would describe as a matte (fairly low-luster) black silk organza; in the text is is described as a “black silk organdy.”

  • Butterick Publishing Company, The. Vogue Sewing. Revised edition. New York: The Butterick Publishing Company, 2000.

On page 42, it is stated that “Pattern weaves are the glory of the weaver’s art. Delicate traditional coverlet designs can be created on a simple loom by an intricate order of threading. Other pattern weaves, such as crisp piqués, filmy curtain gauze, and patterns of flowers and scrolls in rich, deep brocades owe their existence to more complex variations on the loom.” Further, it states that “Leno weaves are used most effectively in lacy, open fabrics. A special attachment twists the warp yarns around each other in a figure eight as the filling passes through, imparting stability to fabrics with widely spaced yarns.”

On page 177, “gauze” is defined as “from ‘Gaza;’ very thin, light, transparent silk fabric.” Also on page 177, “grenadine” is defined as “thin, gauze-like fabric of wool or silk, plain or figured” and “grenadine barege” as “thin, gauze fabric.” On page 178, “ninon” is defined as “sheer, plain weave fabric, a little heavier than chiffon, woven from various yarns.” On page 179, “organdy” is defined as “fine thin muslin, plain or figured, often stiffened, used for dresses.” On page 180, “silk tissue” is defined as “fine, transparent silk fabric.” Also on page 180, “tissue” is defined as “fine, light, gauzy fabric, sometimes used for veils.”

There is no definition for organza, which is not surprising, because it seems to be a fairly modern term. On page 312, “organdy” is defined as “A fine, sheer cotton fabric of plain weave; a thin, transparent, wiry muslin that can be dyed, printed, or white.”

On page 246, “gauze” is defined as “A thin, light, transparent fabric woven in a crossed-warp technique. By extension, any sheer, open fabric.” On page 247, “gossamer” is defined as “A rich silk gauze, nearly as open as common gauze, but at least four times as thick and strong. It was used for veils and dresses. On page 248, “grenadine” is defined as “an open silk or wilk and wool textile used for dresses. Braun-Ronsdorf called it a lightweight fabric of a silk / wool mixture, plain or figured, similar to barege, while Peuchet, circa 1800, called it a superfine barracan.” Note that in several places in this book, “gauze” is referred to as being a weave, synonymous with leno weave.

The definition of “tissue” on pages 366-367 are very different from those in Marsh’s glossary (see above), and relate to decorative and ecclesiastical use. On page 366 it is stated that “The weaves often included silver and gold threads. Technically tissue was made with two sets of warp threads and at least two sets of shafts, and with one or more pattern wefts controlled by the figure harness on a drawloom.”

Online Resources:

For more information about an individual fiber, fabric, or other material, select it on the right side menu for “Fibers, Fabrics, and Materials.” This will bring up all entries which have that tag, including (in most cases) a Glossary post like this one, which will offer a definition of that fiber, fabric, or material, and sometimes also offer useful links to outside sources on working with it. For more general information, visit the core entry for the Glossary: Fibers, Fabrics, and Materials. For a directory of all textile glossary posts, go to the Glossary Table of Contents.

Updated January 10, 2012